Rooftop Vegetable Garden – with Caitlin Bragg

During my stay with my sister in Ontario, I was a frequent visitor of Trent University. Here there is a large vegetable garden with a difference. It is on the rooftop of the environmental science building! The garden was part of the initial building design, it can support 18 inches of saturated soil, there is irrigation and drainage, and a very necessary impermeable membrane beneath the soil to protect the building. It, and another ground based plot, provide food for The Seasoned Spoon – an on-site cafeteria for the students of the university. How did this garden come about? What can they produce? How do they keep their vegetables happy?

On the 1st June I spoke with Caitlin Bragg who is Coordinator Of Trent Vegetable Gardens at Trent University in Ontario, Canada.

To listen to this programme about Trent Rooftop Vegetable Garden please click on http://www.accessradio.org/Player.aspx?eid=3069242c-c20f-44dc-afd8-a358b48a866d. (PS – If this link is not working it may be because it is an older show. Let me know! We will re-air popular shows.)

To listen to other Eco Living in Action radio shows on the Otago Access Radio Website go to http://www.accessradio.org/ProgrammePage.aspx?PID=d6c5fa93-1644-4811-acef-71386373b70a

For more information –

This show was originally broadcast on the 16th June 2016 with the help of Otago Access Radio 105.4FM. Eco Living in Action is sponsored by Sustainable Dunedin City.

Caitlin Bragg weeding in the garlic patch on the Trent Rooftop Vegetable Garden

Caitlin Bragg weeding in the garlic patch on the Trent Rooftop Vegetable Garden

Poster to encourage volunteers to help out on the Trent Rooftop Vegetable Garden

Poster to encourage volunteers to help out on the Trent Rooftop Vegetable Garden

 

 

 

View of the rooftop garden in early June before the main planting has begun

View of the rooftop garden in early June before the main planting has begun

 

 

The garlic

The garlic

 

 

 

Compost to enrich the beds

Compost to enrich the beds

 

Straw is used as mulch to retain moisture and prevent soil erosion from the wind

Straw is used as mulch to retain moisture and prevent soil erosion from the wind

 

 

Trees and buildings act as buffers to reduce wind on the rooftop garden

Trees and buildings act as buffers to reduce wind on the rooftop garden

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s